You are here:

An interactive, computer-based social skills training program: Development and use with children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
DISSERTATION

, The University of Utah, United States

The University of Utah . Awarded

Abstract

There were 2 primary purposes of this study. The first purpose was to develop a socially valid and effective computer-based social skills intervention that integrated existing social skills training methods with interactive, multimedia technology. The second purpose was to investigate the effectiveness of this program as a social problem solving skills intervention for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Specifically, the study examined participants' abilities to acquire knowledge of social problem solving skills and to demonstrate these skills effectively across both virtual and behavioral analogue environments.

This study employed the multiple probe variation of the multiple baseline design (MBD) across participants. Three series (1 participant in each of the first 2 series and 2 paired in the third) were included. All participants demonstrated acquisition of problem solving knowledge and improved their ability to enact problem solving skills during analogue role-play assessments. In addition, participants demonstrated an increase in their ability to select the most socially appropriate responses during interactive, video-based scenarios.

Follow-up data collected at 3 and 6 weeks posttreatment indicated that all participants maintained or improved their ability to perform problem solving skills during behavioral analogue assessments. Gains made in participants' ability to select appropriate responses within the virtual environment maintained at follow-up for 3 of the 4 participants. Strengths and limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are presented.

Citation

Fenstermacher, K.M. An interactive, computer-based social skills training program: Development and use with children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Ph.D. thesis, The University of Utah. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords