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Content interactivity: The effect of higher levels of interactivity on learner performance outcomes and satisfaction in Web-based military training
DISSERTATION

, Walden University, United States

Walden University . Awarded

Abstract

The effect of content interactivity on performance outcomes and satisfaction has been studied by researchers who compared the results of Web-based and computer-based learning to classroom learning. Few scholars have compared the effects of the same content produced at different levels (low and high) of interactivity and the resulting effects. The purpose of this study was to address the gap in the literature. This study was based on Moore's theory of transactional distance and Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning. The research question directly examined the effects of higher level of course interactivity on learner performance and satisfaction. The quasi-experimental approach used pretest and posttest scores from standardized U.S. military course mastery exams to evaluate academic achievement gains and an end of course survey to evaluate satisfaction with the course. A convenience sample of 1633 learners was partitioned into two treatment groups; limited interaction (LI) and complex interaction (CI) when soldiers registered for online training. Archival course performance data were collected for pretest and posttest scores along with the embedded end of course satisfaction survey . Independent samples t-tests revealed no significant LI/CI differences across 5 areas of student satisfaction with the course; however, the CI group demonstrated significantly greater pre-post gains in course content mastery than were observed for the LI group. The study contributes to positive social change by informing training and education design practices regarding the use of content interactivity to improve learner engagement and performance in online or blended instruction.

Citation

Kenyon, P.L. Content interactivity: The effect of higher levels of interactivity on learner performance outcomes and satisfaction in Web-based military training. Ph.D. thesis, Walden University. Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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