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The computer self-efficacy of African American and Hispanic American community college students as compared to their Caucasian counterparts
DISSERTATION

, Walden University, United States

Walden University . Awarded

Abstract

Current research indicates that African Americans and Hispanic Americans lag behind White and Asian Americans in computer ownership and Internet use. This disparity has been described as the "digital divide"---the schism that exists between those who have access to technology and those who do not. The community college serves as a postsecondary entry point for a growing number of minority students and it is vital that technology be an integral part of the academic experience. The problem addressed by this quantitative study was to determine the level of computer access, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety of African American and Hispanic American community college students compared with Caucasian community college students in the state of Connecticut, as these factors may serve as obstacles to technology adoption. Compeau and Higgins' Computer Self-Efficacy Measure and Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale were administered to a convenience sample of 417 Connecticut community college students enrolled in computer science applications courses around the state. Using the independent-samples t test, one-way between groups ANOVA, Spearmans' rho, and the Chi-square test for independence, data analysis revealed no statistically significant differences among racial or ethnic groups with regard to computer access or computer self-efficacy although Hispanic American community college students experienced a higher level of computer anxiety when compared with African American and Caucasian community college students. The results of this study contributed to positive social change by identifying potential barriers to technology use for students who may already be burdened by socioeconomic and cultural challenges that impede academic and occupational success.

Citation

Clifford, P.M. The computer self-efficacy of African American and Hispanic American community college students as compared to their Caucasian counterparts. Ph.D. thesis, Walden University. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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