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A study of student characteristics and their effect on student satisfaction with online courses
DISSERTATION

, West Virginia University, United States

West Virginia University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between selected student characteristics and the level of student satisfaction in online courses at Marshall University. The study examined characteristics as identified in the literature and made conclusions to support or refute previous research. A descriptive research design was used to examine the relationship between the student's age, gender, marital status, employment status, motivation to enroll in online course, expectation of course and experience in course with student satisfaction. Research questions were developed to examine this relationship. The population for this study was N = 554 students who enrolled in online courses at Marshall University during the spring semester 2002. Data were obtained from the Marshall University Institutional Research Board. The data were stored securely and complete anonymity was guaranteed. The researcher utilized a random sample of approximately 60% of the total population n = 330 to measure student satisfaction. The researcher mailed a self-developed survey instrument, inspired by the literature to the random sample of students currently enrolled in online courses. The responses were analyzed and data indicated that students are older than the traditional student, more females are enrolled than males and the majority of online students surveyed were single and working adults. Data analysis identified gender as a predictor of student satisfaction in online courses. Significant findings were revealed when student satisfaction was measured on the basis of student motivation to enroll in online courses, student expectation of online courses and student experience in the online courses.

Citation

Kirtley, K.E. A study of student characteristics and their effect on student satisfaction with online courses. Ph.D. thesis, West Virginia University. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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