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Microphones and TV screens and cameras, oh my! A study of communication apprehension in synchronous distance education
THESIS

, Utah State University, United States

Utah State University . Awarded

Abstract

This study builds on previous qualitative research that shows students in synchronous distance education settings experience high levels of anxiety, reluctance, and frustration when using technologies to interact. The constructs of traitlike- and state-communication apprehension (CA) were used to define and quantitatively assess these levels. Prior communication apprehension research shows students experiencing high levels of CA show less academic success than their peers.

The sample studied consisted of 385 undergraduate and graduate students in 19 courses delivered over a synchronous distance education system to 25 remote sites. The students completed surveys that contained measures to determine the student's prior experience with communication technologies, familiarity with communication technologies, level of state-CA, level of traitlike-CA, and level of communication apprehension when communicating via technology (technology-CA).

Results showed a moderate level of state-CA in students surveyed. The level traitlike-CA was consistent with the national average. Levels of technology-CA were determined for the sample. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationship between the scores for each measure. Strong positive correlations existed between the measure of technology-CA and measures of traitlike- and state-CA. Moderate negative correlations existed between the measure of technology-CA and measures of prior experience, and familiarity. These findings suggest that some individuals may experience an enduring "traitlike" aversion to communicate via technology.

Citation

Monson, S.J. Microphones and TV screens and cameras, oh my! A study of communication apprehension in synchronous distance education. Master's thesis, Utah State University. Retrieved December 19, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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