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Effect of Internet-based health promotion on college preparatory stream adolescent girls' knowledge of depression
THESIS

, University of New Brunswick , Canada

University of New Brunswick . Awarded

Abstract

Prevalence of depression among girls by mid-adolescence, and the propensity for this trend to continue through young adulthood into middle age, emphasizes the importance of examining current approaches to the delivery of health information about adolescent depression. A quasi-experimental, comparison group design was used to assess the effectiveness of the Internet for the provision of information about adolescent depression to college preparatory grade 11 and 12 adolescent girls. The Knowledge about Depression Scale (KaDS) was administered to a sample of 72 adolescent females at a girls only public high school in eastern Canada. The Theory of Planned Behaviour provided the conceptual framework for the study.

The principal finding indicated a significant difference in knowledge about depression for those subjects in the experimental group who received information via the Internet. Significant relationships were found between subjects having a personal history of depression and those currently taking antidepressants, subjects with a family history of depression and having a friend with depression. A negative correlation was found between importance of religious beliefs and those currently taking antidepressants. Limitations and significance of the research are addressed, implications for practice, education, and research discussed. Knowledge generated from this study will be useful for determining future directions for the delivery of health information about adolescent depression.

Citation

Johnston, M.S. Effect of Internet-based health promotion on college preparatory stream adolescent girls' knowledge of depression. Master's thesis, University of New Brunswick. Retrieved February 17, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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