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The effects of a computerized biomechanical analysis as a teaching strategy on the recovery arm of the freestyle swim stroke
DISSERTATION

, The University of New Mexico, United States

The University of New Mexico . Awarded

Abstract

An analysis of covariance was computed to test for significance of the effects of three teaching strategies on the radius of rotation and linear displacement of the breathing and non-breathing recovery arms of the freestyle swim stroke. One hundred registered United States Swimming boys and girls between the ages of 8 through 12 years were given “intact groups” assignment. The participants were selected from U.S. Swimming teams from the states of Colorado and New Mexico. The study included 25 participants for each of the following four groups: (a) control (C), (b) traditional (T) teaching strategy, (c) traditional and videotape (TV) teaching strategy, and (d) traditional and Never Ending Athletic Trainer (NEAT) System computerized biomechanical analysis (TN) teaching strategy.

Participants were individually videotaped while swimming 25 meters of the freestyle swim stroke. Measurements from the radius of rotation and linear displacement of the radial/ulnarhumeral and glenohumeral joint segment were calculated by the NEAT System software. ANCOVA established significance in radius of rotation and linear displacement. It was determined that all treatments effected increase in radius of rotation and linear displacement. Therefore, all of the teaching strategies caused significant improvement in the radius of rotation and linear displacement for the breathing recovery arm of the freestyle swim stroke.

Physiological benefits included enhanced awareness of correct shoulder elevation that could improve swimming skill and swimming times. Psychological benefits might have included increased self-concept. Benefits also included knowledge of better teaching strategies such as computerized biomechanical analysis to enhance motor learning.

Citation

Higdon, C.L. The effects of a computerized biomechanical analysis as a teaching strategy on the recovery arm of the freestyle swim stroke. Ph.D. thesis, The University of New Mexico. Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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