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Assessing College Students' Desire to Enhance Global Learning Professional Competencies
DISSERTATION

, Walden University, United States

Walden University . Awarded

Abstract

Researchers of education have documented that students' use of social software technology (SST) and personal tacit knowledge (P-T K) enhance global learning professional competencies (GLPCs). However, little is currently known regarding the relationship linking college students' thoughts and feelings regarding use of SST to enhance GLPCs and use of P-T K to enhance GLPCs. The purpose of this study was to assess college student's thoughts and feelings regarding use SST and P-T K to enhance GLPCs. The study draws from technology constructivist learning theory, conceptual dimensions of SST that include social networking, constructing knowledge, identifying and actualizing self, conceptual dimensions of P-T K that include cognitive, technical, and social skills, and concepts of GLPCs. The research questions addressed included determining relationships linking students' thoughts and feelings regarding (a) use of social networking, constructing knowledge, identifying and actualizing self to enhance GLPCs and (b) use of cognitive, technical, and social skills to enhance GLPCs. Data were collected using an Internet self-administered survey. A quantitative correlation design with a stratified random sample of 289 college student participants was implemented. Data collected included survey responses from pilot study and research study. MANCOVA tested relationship effects among dimensions of SST and GLPCs and dimensions of P-T K and GLPCs. The relationship effects were significant, p < .001. Implications for social change include raising awareness among academic leaders to focus on college students' thoughts about the use of SST and P-T K to enhance GLPCs, which can prepare students to solve world-wide problems.

Citation

King, R.R. Assessing College Students' Desire to Enhance Global Learning Professional Competencies. Ph.D. thesis, Walden University. Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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