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Faculty perceptions and use of social media in the medical imaging curriculum in the United States
DISSERTATION

, Arkansas State University, United States

Arkansas State University . Awarded

Abstract

Social media networks are a worldwide phenomenon encompassing multiple generations of faculty and students. As the World Wide Web has developed and grown, so has the ability of individuals to communicate across hundreds and thousands of miles via these social media networks. An exploratory survey of members in the Association of Educators in Imaging and Radiologic Sciences was completed and analyzed to determine faculty perceptions and use of social media in the medical imaging curriculum in the United States.

Medical imaging faculty were asked if they own a personal social media account, a professional social media account, and if they use social media in the classroom. This study revealed that approximately 74 percent of faculty own a personal social media account, while approximately 46 percent own a professional (networking) social media account. Approximately 69 percent of medical imaging faculty indicated that they incorporate at least one type of social media in the classroom, with YouTube being the most popular social media platform used in all listed subject areas (Introduction, Lab, Procedures, Physics/Exposure, Pathology, Clinical Education, Patient Care, and Radiobiology).

Faculty were given the opportunity to provide feedback on the perceived advantages and disadvantages of social media use in the medical imaging curriculum. While 31 percent of faculty believe that social networks take more time than they are worth, 67 percent believe that social media should be used to enhance learning in the medical imaging curriculum.

Citation

DuBose, C. Faculty perceptions and use of social media in the medical imaging curriculum in the United States. Ph.D. thesis, Arkansas State University. Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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