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The effects of a multimedia video intervention's emotional content and ethnic matching on HIV prevention and testing related knowledge, behavior, and intent
DISSERTATION

, New York University, United States

New York University . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined participant response to a series of educational video segments delivered on a handheld computer. Each intervention video segment was developed to test a relevant theory of educational media production. The study addressed two related issues: Should an educational video presentation feature people who are ethnically matched to the viewer, or will the depiction of people who intentionally do not match the viewer result in greater effectiveness? Further, does video content designed to elicit a positive emotional response in viewers lead to greater effectiveness than content designed to elicit a negative emotional response, such as fear or anger?

To study issues of matching and emotional content in an authentic, meaningful context, I developed a computer-based video learning environment to educate emergency department patients about HIV testing and prevention. It appears from the data that various groups responded to this study's treatments in very different ways. Not only did interesting between-group differences emerge by ethnicity, but the treatments which resulted in greater numbers of people accepting an HIV test when they had not been offered a test at triage were not necessarily the same treatments that led participants to accept a test after they had refused one earlier.

This may indicate that instead of the standard practice of delivering a single type of educational video content to all learners, or even to particular groups of learners, future interventions can be fine-tuned for greater effectiveness among members of specific population groups and to achieve specific cognitive, affective, or behavioral outcomes.

Citation

Aronson, I.D. The effects of a multimedia video intervention's emotional content and ethnic matching on HIV prevention and testing related knowledge, behavior, and intent. Ph.D. thesis, New York University. Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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