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Course completion and Alabama High School Graduation Exam success: A case study of a credit recovery program in a central Alabama school district
DISSERTATION

, Alabama State University, United States

Alabama State University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this mixed-methods case study was to give a more complete picture and a deeper understanding of the effectiveness and participant perceptions of the MAX (Pseudonym) credit recovery program. Quantitative data were examined to provide a better understanding of the context in which the MAX program operates. Additionally, this study has given voice to these at-risk participants by allowing them to share their experiences with the MAX credit recovery program through semi-structured interviews. The quantitative data indicated a strong negative correlation exists between the overall relationship of the average number of courses completed prior to the entry of the MAX program and the number of courses completed during a year or less in the MAX program. A moderate positive correlation was found between the overall number of sections passed on the Alabama High School Graduation Exam before and after students entered the MAX program. Qualitative data revealed personal circumstances, truancy, academic failure, negative student/teacher relationships, and negative influence of peers have led students to participate in the MAX program. It also revealed that the strengths of the MAX program were increased attendance, positive student/teacher relationships, positive influence of peers, online learning, the career technical education experience, and the overall MAX program experience. Weaknesses of the MAX program included that students felt left out on school events at their home high school, they often missed their peers from their home high school, and felt a culinary arts program would be beneficial.

Citation

Bostick, S.C. Course completion and Alabama High School Graduation Exam success: A case study of a credit recovery program in a central Alabama school district. Ph.D. thesis, Alabama State University. Retrieved February 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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