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A social impact theory framework for examining *influence in computer-mediated communication
DISSERTATION

, University of Minnesota, United States

University of Minnesota . Awarded

Abstract

This study utilized a Social Impact Theory framework to explore new sources and functions of communicator influence in computer-mediated communication. This study involved five online graduate classes (n1 = 15, n 2 = 11, n3 = 10, n4 = 12, n5 = 12) at a research university. Participants included 43 females and 17 males ranging from 25 to 60 years of age. Participants engaged in anonymous and computer-mediated discourse and then nominated peers who were directive, influential to the positive, and/or influential to the negative during the online interaction. It was expected that high numbers of peer nominations would illustrate participants who elicited social impact. Four interpersonal factors were chosen as strength operants in the social impact framework and were therefore expected to predict social impact. Of the four, assertiveness and exaggeration were significant, while emotional intensity and sensitivity were not. Two factors were chosen as immediacy operants in the social impact framework and were also expected to predict social impact. Of the two, contribution total and word total were both significant predictors of social impact.

Citation

Miller, M.D. A social impact theory framework for examining *influence in computer-mediated communication. Ph.D. thesis, University of Minnesota. Retrieved December 19, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords