You are here:

The effect of videotape-augmented feedback on jump-landing technique
DISSERTATION

, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . Awarded

Abstract

A four-experimental group design, with pre- and post-training tests, was used to compare the effects of three different models of videotaped augmented feedback (VAF) and a non-feedback group on seven kinetic and kinematic variables (peak vertical ground reaction forces, peak proximal anterior tibial shear forces, knee flexion and valgus/varus angles at initial ground contact and at peak proximal anterior tibial shear force, and knee angular displacement flexion angles). Results revealed that all VAF groups and a non-feedback group significantly reduced peak vertical ground reaction forces across performance and retention tests while performing a modified basketball rebounding task. The most important aspect of this finding was that a self or a combination VAF model significantly changes peak vertical ground reaction forces greater than a non-feedback group across a one-week retention test. Also, the fact that the self VAF group changes peak vertical ground reaction forces to a significantly greater extent than the expert VAF group across a one-week retention period providing support of utilizing a self-model for increasing change score performance in reducing peak vertical ground reaction forces. The second important finding of this study was that individuals in each of the VAF model groups significantly increased their knee angular displacement flexion angles during performance and retention tests as compared to baseline scores, while the non-feedback group did not change significantly. Of greater importance was finding that the change scores for the retention tests resulted in the combination and self VAF groups increasing their knee angular displacement flexion angles to a greater extent than the non-feedback group during the retention test. These two main findings suggest that the inclusion of watching one's own video demonstrations may be an important factor for improving jump-landing techniques between baseline and either an immediate performance or a delayed retention test. These findings suggest that future jump-landing instructional programs may wish to utilize self-demonstrations to teach jump-landing technique. The effect of VAF and non-feedback groups did not significantly affect the other kinematic variables, thus suggesting that the effects of VAF are specific to certain aspects of jump-landing technique.

Citation

Onate, J.A. The effect of videotape-augmented feedback on jump-landing technique. Ph.D. thesis, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords