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Efficacy of computer-assisted cognitive training in individuals with serious psychiatric disorders
DISSERTATION

, Illinois Institute of Technology, United States

Illinois Institute of Technology . Awarded

Abstract

Serious mental illness has traditionally been treated with medication management and psychosocial rehabilitation; however, researchers have begun exploring neurocognitive training, as an adjunct to standard treatment approaches. The purpose of the current study was to examine the use of computer-assisted cognitive training in individuals with various serious psychiatric disorders. Forty-one participants were randomly assigned to the cognitive training group (CT) or the wait-list control group (WL). The CT group participated in 12 computerized cognitive training sessions. Neuropsychological functioning, symptom severity, and social skills were assessed at baseline, post-test/post-wait, and at one-month follow-up. The CT group demonstrated significantly greater improvement on Digit Span, Trail Making Tests A and B, and BPRS-E global symptom scores following cognitive training than the WL group receiving treatment as usual. Post-test levels of performance in the CT group were maintained at one-month follow-up. The results of this research provide support for the use of computerized cognitive training to improve attention, cognitive flexibility, and symptomatology in patients with serious mental illness.

Citation

Landsberger, S.A. Efficacy of computer-assisted cognitive training in individuals with serious psychiatric disorders. Ph.D. thesis, Illinois Institute of Technology. Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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