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Relationships between human-computer interface designs and learner interactions in a constructivist-based microworld learning environment
DISSERTATION

, Northern Illinois University, United States

Northern Illinois University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between learner interaction(s) and the use of hypertext-based and virtual reality enhanced hypermedia microworld interfaces in a constructivist-designed microworld.

Sixty-seven high school students from a rural midwestern high school participated in this study. Subjects interacted with a computer-based microworld computer program that served as both an instructional program and a testing instrument. The program, specially developed for this study, randomly assigned either a hypertext or virtual-reality-based interface for the subject to use. The program then placed subjects into a constructivist-based microworld scenario in which they were to assume the role of a police investigator. This role included reviewing the evidence and deciding which criminal charges should be filed against a hypothetical suspect. The software tracked and timed user movement through the program. The results were later tabulated and served as the raw data for analysis.

Results of this study indicated that use of a virtual reality interface was associated with increased interactivity and reduced time on task, while the converse appeared to be true of the hypertext interface. In addition, there appeared to be a relationship between the interface a subject used and the confidence with which a subject filed a charge against the hypothetical suspect. Subjects using the virtual reality interface appeared to be more confident in the fact that the charge was justified, while hypertext interface users appeared to be less confident.

Citation

Beal, J.W. Relationships between human-computer interface designs and learner interactions in a constructivist-based microworld learning environment. Ph.D. thesis, Northern Illinois University. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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