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Exploring communicative space: A comprehensive analysis of the conceptual dimensions of the emerging new media environment
DISSERTATION

, University of Washington, United States

University of Washington . Awarded

Abstract

Although the emerging new media environment has resulted in a glut of popular literature about "cyber communities" and related nomenclature, the concept of mediated communities in non-physical space is actually not new. In fact the conceptual underpinnings of cyber communities unravel back nearly a century, to the work of French sociologist Gabriel Tarde in Europe, for example, and the Chicago School's Robert E. Park in the United States, as well as their intellectual progeny in the social sciences right up to the present day. While it is fashionable, and to some extent correct, to speak of the current changes in mediated communication as a "revolution," it would be unfortunate to overlook the rich intellectual tradition in mass communications that can help put these changes into historical context and provide a conceptual framework for viewing current developments in the new media environment. This dissertation examines the intermingling concepts of community, media and space throughout history and describes the most recent manifestation of these concepts as "communicative space." Through a variety of exploratory methods and original conceptual sketches, the dimensions and implications of communicative space in the new media environment are analyzed and discussed.

Citation

Kawamoto, K.Y. Exploring communicative space: A comprehensive analysis of the conceptual dimensions of the emerging new media environment. Ph.D. thesis, University of Washington. Retrieved February 17, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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