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Evaluation of mobile touch-based collaboration interaction styles to enhance spatial abilities and practice learning for children
THESIS

, University of Wyoming, United States

University of Wyoming . Awarded

Abstract

Spatial reasoning is an important ability that can be improved in childhood. Improved spatial skills are related to the improved performance in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Research has shown advantages to using technology for improving spatial ability skills, but interaction may be limited to the individual or in time allotted with technology due to costs. My research focused on investigating the advantages in using mobile touch-based technology that facilitated task focused talk for enabling children (aging from 7 to 15 years old) to practice their spatial ability skills. My research also determined the performance and strategic planning differences for different collaboration styles of interaction and among gender types.

I designed and developed a mobile touch based application that will allow children to perform spatial ability tasks in a fun way. This application incorporated four different collaboration interaction styles (co-located with shared screens, co-located with directional passing, remote with shared screens, and remote with directional passing). I used this application in an evaluation with a 4×4 mixed subjects design where the group dynamics were considered (FFF, FFM, FMM, and MMM), where M = Male and F = Female. My results have implications for how collaboration interaction styles affect performance and strategy when practicing spatial tasks and for how male and female children are assigned groups in collaborative learning tasks.

Citation

Asiri, Y.A. Evaluation of mobile touch-based collaboration interaction styles to enhance spatial abilities and practice learning for children. Master's thesis, University of Wyoming. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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