You are here:

Psychological Preference and Online Asynchronous Written Dialogue
PROCEEDINGS

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States ; , St. Francis Xavier University, Canada, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Phoenix, Arizona, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-50-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This study explores how adults learn from online asynchronous written dialogue through the lens of psychological type preferences. We asked participants to discover their psychological preferences using the P.E.T. (Personal Empowerment through Type) inventory (Cranton & Knoop, 1995) based on the work of Carl Jung ([1921] 1971). Ninety-two participants then completed an open-ended survey in which they described their experience with learning through asynchronous written dialogue. We observed that the participants' experience was associated with differences in their psychological preferences together with other factors. The relationships between participants' psychological preferences and the way they engaged in asynchronous written dialogue are discussed in this paper.

Citation

Lin, L. & Cranton, P. (2003). Psychological Preference and Online Asynchronous Written Dialogue. In A. Rossett (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2003--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1694-1697). Phoenix, Arizona, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 19, 2019 from .

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References