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A survey of counselor trainee preferred learning style and its relationship to computer skills and technology use
THESIS

, West Virginia University, United States

West Virginia University . Awarded

Abstract

Computer use by counselors has dramatically increased over the years. A review of the literature has demonstrated the importance of computer and technology-related competencies for professional counselors. The purpose of this study is to examine the preferred learning styles of counselors-in-training along with their attitudes toward computers and technology use to determine if there is a relationship between their preferred learning styles and technology use. This study also examined the attitudes that counselors-in-training had about technology to determine if these attitudes affect the use of computers and/or their desire to learn how to use computers in training.

Counselors-in-training from 6 CACREP accredited universities agreed to participate in the study. The trainees who participated completed the demographic questionnaire, the Computer use survey, and the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. The data collected was analyzed by examining the correlations among the instruments and conducting a Chi-square analysis on the measures used in the study. The results indicated that there were no significant findings with regard to the learning styles of counselors-in-training and their attitudes toward computer use. There also were no significant findings with regard to counselor-in-training ratings of technology-related competencies, or the ratings between the different learning styles from the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. However, when rating their preferred mode of instruction, it was found not one participant checked online instruction as their preferred mode of instruction. Therefore, there were significant findings with regard to online instruction as a preferred mode of instruction for participants in the study.

Citation

Berry, T. A survey of counselor trainee preferred learning style and its relationship to computer skills and technology use. Master's thesis, West Virginia University. Retrieved February 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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