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Comparable effects of the use of a computer-assisted, facilitative teaching approach to a traditional, lecture teaching approach on college students' learning about and subsequent use of alcohol
DISSERTATION

, Texas A&M University - Commerce, United States

Texas A&M University - Commerce . Awarded

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a computer assisted, facilitative teaching approach to a traditional, lecture teaching approach on college students' learning about and subsequent use of alcohol. The independent variables identified in this study were the teaching method used to teach a two-hour Judicial Alcohol Education Class to college students and gender. There were two levels of the teaching method, which were tested—traditional, lecture method (Traditional), and the computer-assisted, facilitative method using Alcohol 101 (Alcohol 101). Additionally, the male/female gender demographic was used in a comparison of the treatments across this variable. Dependent variables, measured from The Student Drinking Information Scale (Gonzalez, 1978b), were quantity-frequency of alcohol use (QF), knowledge about alcohol (Knowledge), level of responsible attitudes toward drinking alcohol (Attitudes), and negative behavioral consequences due to drinking alcohol (Negative Consequences). There were 148 total participants that included 84 male and 64 female students from a medium-sized university in the Northeastern United States.

The design of the study included 12 analyses of covariance—one for each of the null hypotheses. The analyses measured whether there were post-test differences between all of the independent variable combinations on each of the dependent variables after adjusting for the pre-test scores. Results of the 12 ANCOVAs reported a significant difference between post-test means in 9 of the 12 subject group/dependant variable combinations. These differences favored the computer-assisted, facilitative teaching method using Alcohol 101. The QF post-test scores for the all-subjects and the women-only groups also reported significant differences between the 2 teaching methods favoring the traditional, lecture method. There was no significant difference found between the 2 teaching methods on post-test measures of alcohol knowledge for the women subjects.

This study was completed as part of the University's campus alcohol prevention efforts and disciplinary system, which afforded the opportunity to test the efficacy of the computer-assisted, facilitative method of teaching using Alcohol 101 compared to the lecture-based approach. The significant results suggested that campuses expand social norms intervention and student skill building using the computer-assisted, facilitative method of teaching with Alcohol 101.

Citation

Allison, D.L. Comparable effects of the use of a computer-assisted, facilitative teaching approach to a traditional, lecture teaching approach on college students' learning about and subsequent use of alcohol. Ph.D. thesis, Texas A&M University - Commerce. Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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