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Exploring face-to-face and online classroom discourse: A case study of social roles as performed in a college course
DISSERTATION

, University of California, Riverside, United States

University of California, Riverside . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined how class participants in a college course reified or challenged normative classroom communication practices; by interrogating how a teacher and her students used language (to include patterns and discourses) in their day-to-day interactions, this study worked to uncover the social roles constructed and performed by class participants. The findings suggest that both familiar and atypical roles existed simultaneously, and that linguistic practices reflected both familiar ritual and newly-constructed conventions within a case study "hybrid" university classroom. Findings are presented by distinguishing between social roles performed within the face-to-face and online classroom environments, then comparisons across environments are made, future research avenues are proposed, and primary contributions are discussed.

Citation

Brooks, C.F. Exploring face-to-face and online classroom discourse: A case study of social roles as performed in a college course. Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Riverside. Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords