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Preservice teachers' computer use, computer attitudes and perceived self-efficacy with computer technology: A longitudinal study
DISSERTATION

, University of Virginia, United States

University of Virginia . Awarded

Abstract

Teachers need to feel comfortable and confident with various computer technologies in order to be able to use them effectively and be models for their students' computer use. The computer training teachers receive through their teacher education program tends to foster the development of positive computer affects. This longitudinal study evaluated preserve teachers' change in frequency of using selected computer technologies, computer attitudes and perceived self-efficacy with selected computer technologies over their course of study. Statistical analyses of data involved three time periods and two preservice teacher cohorts. A significant Time effect was found in each of the 14 variables and a significant Cohort effect was found in frequency of using e-mail and in perceived self-efficacy with word processing. A significant Time by Cohort effect was found only in perceived self-efficacy with e-mail. Another purpose of this study was to examine relationships between variables. Pearson product-moment correlations provided an overview for significant bivariate relationships across time. At each time period, canonical correlation analysis was able to identify at least one significant component of the overall relationship between the two variable sets. However, these components of relationship varied over time.

Citation

Lin, Y.C.S. Preservice teachers' computer use, computer attitudes and perceived self-efficacy with computer technology: A longitudinal study. Ph.D. thesis, University of Virginia. Retrieved July 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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