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Architectural history of industrial Los Angeles: California's last railroad signal buildings, Redondo Junction Tower (1906–2001) and Hobart Tower (1926–2002)
THESIS

, California State University, Dominguez Hills, United States

California State University, Dominguez Hills . Awarded

Abstract

This study is an architectural history of California's last two railroad signal towers. Built in the early twentieth century and ceasing operations by the winter of 2002, these utilitarian buildings were known as Redondo Junction Tower and Hobart Tower. The towers and associated staff served Greater Metropolitan Los Angeles, location of the busiest freight rail corridor in North America. In 2002, Redondo Junction and Hobart Towers ceased operations; the position of tower operator became extinct west of the Mississippi River.

This study assumes that the obsolescence of industrial buildings often results in the loss of a community's architectural history. The loss is compounded by the displacement of the associated work force. By documenting the history, technology, and architecture of California's last signal towers, a piece of California history might be saved for future generations.

Citation

Livingstone, D.M. Architectural history of industrial Los Angeles: California's last railroad signal buildings, Redondo Junction Tower (1906–2001) and Hobart Tower (1926–2002). Master's thesis, California State University, Dominguez Hills. Retrieved February 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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