You are here:

Instructional technology and self-directed learning: An analysis of the relationship between online students' self-directed learning ability and instructional technology competency
DISSERTATION

, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between continuing education professionals' (students) self-directed learning (SDL) ability, and instructional technology (IT) competency in courses of master's degree online programs. The study also investigated the motivation and learning strategies that the students used to learn the technology in an online course, and their association with SDL ability. The research involved surveying 198 students who took the online courses in a large Midwest state university.

The results of the study indicate a small, but statistically significant improvement in students' IT competency by the end of their online course. The results also show statistically significant positive correlation between SDL and level of IT competency in students with SDL ability above the average. Additionally, the analysis suggests that, regardless of the students' level of self-directedness, motivation is likely a major factor for learning IT in an online course followed by the particular learning strategies. Among the four elements of motivation, as measured by the modification of MSLQ, the components of intrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy for learning and performance appear as most associated with the process of learning IT. Likewise, effort regulation and regulation of time and study environment appear as the learning strategies that students often utilized for learning IT.

The results of the study also suggest possible variations in the learning strategies that students with different levels of SDL ability applied for learning IT in an online course. Cognitive learning strategies of metacognitive self-regulation, elaboration, and critical thinking appear as substantial factors in learning IT for students with SDL ability above the average. For students with SDL ability below the average, strategies of peer learning, rehearsal, and help seeking appear as more important factors in learning IT than the cognitive strategies.

Citation

Shinkareva, O. Instructional technology and self-directed learning: An analysis of the relationship between online students' self-directed learning ability and instructional technology competency. Ph.D. thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved September 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords