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The use of mobile technology in education by international students in United States universities: Perceptions regarding mobile applications for English language learning DISSERTATION

, Robert Morris University, United States

Robert Morris University . Awarded

Abstract

The current spread of network and communication technologies has caused an increase in the use of mobile devices. Among many educational applications (Apps), Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students use Mobile Apps for English Language Learning (MAELL). MAELL has become a central tool for foreign students learning English. Ideally, user interface designers and app programmers compete to develop the most effective mobile app for ELL. Students ought to be able to choose the most effective mobile Apps tool to learn English, but it is not clear what is the most effective mobile app from the student's perspective. What are the criteria students use to choose MAELL and what is the app (s) that they find most successful? This study surveyed perceptions of international students in three U.S. universities regarding mobile Apps for ELL by measuring three important effectiveness factors: satisfaction (system and information quality), efficiency (ease of use and usefulness), and other people's influence (the social norm). The findings showed that satisfaction is the most powerful factor students rely on when choosing an app. The study showed that lack of satisfaction (system and information quality), is considered the most important factor that influenced some international students to give up the mobile application. Additionally, students from different cultures had different reactions to the mobile Apps. The study generated a list of Apps that were effective from the international students' perspectives.

Citation

Almasri, R. The use of mobile technology in education by international students in United States universities: Perceptions regarding mobile applications for English language learning. Ph.D. thesis, Robert Morris University. Retrieved June 22, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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