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Convergence in the classroom: Expanding new media delivery and content in journalism and broadcast courses
THESIS

, Michigan State University, United States

Master of Arts, Michigan State University . Awarded

Abstract

Journalism and broadcast programs have long been staples in high school curriculums. The skills needed to produce a successful newspaper, yearbook, radio program, or television show reach across multiple disciplines, fulfilling many state standards along the way. Students work collaboratively to create something original with a focus on their local audience. Increased technology use and availability has altered how these publications are created. However, that has not lead to widespread changes in how content is delivered over the Internet.

Meanwhile, the professional journalism world has taken steps to embrace these changes. More content is being delivered online, with a focus on new media technologies instead of the written word. Content is still at the heart of respectable publications, but they are adapting to fit changing consumer needs. As this happens, student publications must take the cue and start creating new types of content. They can repurpose traditional reports for new media applications. This will prepare young journalists for their future careers.

This paper will present the reasons why some schools have already made the switch, as well as show ways to reproduce the results in other classrooms.

Citation

Whiting, J. Convergence in the classroom: Expanding new media delivery and content in journalism and broadcast courses. Master of Arts thesis, Michigan State University. Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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