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An Internet evaluation of diabetics' self-reported knowledge of diabetes, attitudes toward diabetes, self-care empowerment levels, and diabetic complications DISSERTATION

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

Doctor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University . Awarded

Abstract

The United States is facing a diabetes epidemic of great proportions. This study investigated the relationship between diabetics' self-reported knowledge of diabetes, attitudes toward diabetes, self-care empowerment levels, and diabetes complications. The study created a new website that hosted the study. The subjects were also asked to rate the new website. The study used a sample composed of mostly Whites, not allowing a meaningful comparison with other racial groups. The study found that of all the variables related to diabetes complications, those who valued tight control had the fewest diabetes complications. Those who rated the website the highest were those who were Whites, had the highest knowledge of the disease, and spend the most time browsing the new internet site. The findings suggest the manner in which those who have been taught about tight control are most likely to have the fewest complications, and that medical personnel are well advised to emphasize tight control in their work with diabetes patients. However, medical personnel should know that the innovation of educating patients via a website will likely be best received by those who already have high knowledge and are White. The research cannot speak to what will work in engaging people of color, since the sample was not diverse. It is possible that non-Whites abandoned the survey or were not engaged by the website, resulting in the low number of non-White respondents. Further research may need to use interviews and focus groups in the order to learn more about the factors related to diabetes complications for non-White to see whether web-based interventions appeal to non-Whites.

Citation

Ikeme, A. An Internet evaluation of diabetics' self-reported knowledge of diabetes, attitudes toward diabetes, self-care empowerment levels, and diabetic complications. Doctor of Education thesis, Teachers College, Columbia University. Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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