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Correlation of student expectations of online classes and course *grades at a community college
DISSERTATION

, University of Phoenix, United States

D.M., University of Phoenix . Awarded

Abstract

Course grades are lower in community colleges compared to 4-year schools; however, little research is available regarding the factors relating to course grades in 2-year schools. Due to decreased course grades in online classes and the expected growth of distance education programs, community college leaders need to take action to help students achieve success in college. The purpose of the quantitative, correlational research study was to determine if a relationship exists between student expectations of online classes and course grades for a convenience sample of students enrolled in one or more online classes at a community college in central North Carolina. The student expectations of the level of difficulty, time commitment, and required technical and computer skills were correlated with student course grades. The participants included 123 students enrolled in one or more online classes at a community college. Data collection involved a researcher-developed survey and obtaining end-of-course grades. Results indicated that a statistically significant relationship existed between student expectations of the time commitment of online classes and course grades. The greater the student perceived the time commitment the more likely the student was to pass the course. A significant relationship did not exist between student expectations of the difficulty and required technical and computer skills of online classes and course retention. A significant relationship did exist between a set of predictor variables including student perceptions of the difficulty, time commitment, required technical and computer skills, and course grades.

Citation

Farmer, L.A. Correlation of student expectations of online classes and course *grades at a community college. D.M. thesis, University of Phoenix. Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords