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Effects of Content Acquisition Podcasts to Develop Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports
ARTICLE

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Exceptionality Volume 20, Number 1, ISSN 0936-2835

Abstract

A critical issue facing the field of education is the need to improve teachers' preparation to effectively manage student behavior in the classroom. Many pre- and in-service teachers receive exposure to evidence-based behavioral interventions, such as schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports, during teacher preparation programs; however, face-to-face instructional time is always at a premium given the range of learning experiences that must be acquired prior to licensure. Consequently, many educators begin their careers without strong classroom management skills, which has many unfortunate consequences, including the decision for some to leave the field within the first three to five years. In this study, we evaluated content acquisition podcasts based on validated instructional design principles. We focused on determining the extent to which preservice teachers could learn core information related to schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports using a short multimedia vignette compared to students who learned content using traditional methods (e.g., reading and note taking). Results show students who learned by watching content acquisition podcasts significantly outperformed students who had unlimited time to read a chapter on SW-PBIS and had access to other learning materials on a test of knowledge related to schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports. Implications for practice and future research are presented. (Contains 1 figure and 6 tables.)

Citation

Kennedy, M.J. & Thomas, C.N. (2012). Effects of Content Acquisition Podcasts to Develop Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Exceptionality, 20(1), 1-19. Retrieved July 21, 2019 from .

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