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College Student Preferences for Absolute Knowledge and Perspective in Instruction: Implications for Traditional and Online Learning Environments
ARTICLE

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Quarterly Review of Distance Education Volume 8, Number 4, ISSN 1528-3518

Abstract

Survey data from 174 university students are presented, on a scale designed to measure preference for absolute knowledge and perspective in instruction, including online discussions. Results demonstrate a strong effect of class level such that students in lower grade levels reported a greater preference for instruction involving unambiguous knowledge directed from one point, the instructor. Implications follow that to effectively design e-based courses that match student expectations, instructors need to consider that course activities based in knowledge sharing and multiple perspective taking (i.e., via collaborative online discussions) may run contrary to epistemological beliefs of many freshman and sophomores. (Contains 1 figure.)

Citation

Ravert, R.D. & Evans, M.A. (2007). College Student Preferences for Absolute Knowledge and Perspective in Instruction: Implications for Traditional and Online Learning Environments. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 8(4), 321-328. Retrieved July 20, 2019 from .

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