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Learning Together: Exploring Group Interactions Online
ARTICLE

JDE Volume 19, Number 1, ISSN 0830-0445 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

Recent studies in the literature on online learning highlight a constructivist approach to knowledge-building in Web-based environments. In this case study of an online course, students were introduced to a constructivist orientation toward learning, a requirement to work in a new learning environment, and a challenge to accomplish academic work with groups of colleagues. Students learned successfully how to accommodate these requirements. In particular, this article tells how communication strategies, collaboration with one another, interaction throughout the course, and consistent participation in the growing online database supported students' perceptions of self-efficacy and their emerging commitment to a constructivist approach to learning. (Contains 1 table.)

Citation

Gabriel, M. (2004). Learning Together: Exploring Group Interactions Online. The Journal of Distance Education / Revue de l'ducation Distance, 19(1), 54-72. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved April 24, 2019 from .

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