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Making distance learning courses accessible to students and instructors with disabilities: A case study
ARTICLE

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Internet and Higher Education Volume 7, Number 3, ISSN 1096-7516 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Worldwide, distance learning programs offer opportunities for education and career enhancement for those who have access to a computer and the Internet. However, some potential students and instructors who have access to these technologies cannot fully participate because of the inaccessible design of courses. These individuals include those with visual and hearing impairments. The University of Washington Distance Learning program and the campus unit that provides computer access for students and instructors with disabilities teamed up with DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology), a national center that promotes the use of accessible technology, to improve the accessibility of the University's distance learning courses. The authors of this article discuss their ongoing efforts as well as lessons learned so that others might benefit from their experiences. They also provide an overview of access challenges and solutions for people with disabilities, legislation, accommodation and universal design approaches to accessibility, and standards and guidelines.

Citation

Burgstahler, S., Corrigan, B. & McCarter, J. (2004). Making distance learning courses accessible to students and instructors with disabilities: A case study. Internet and Higher Education, 7(3), 233-246. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Internet and Higher Education on January 29, 2019. Internet and Higher Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2004.06.004

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