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E-Learning Challenges in the Arab World: Revelations from a Case Study Profile
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Quality Assurance in Education Volume 12, Number 1, ISSN 0968-4883

Abstract

The overwhelming traditional knowledge delivery system for higher education in the Arab world demonstrates the pronounced information technology (IT) gap between Arab countries and the developed world. This study demonstrates the problems and possibilities of implementing e-learning in Arab educational institutions through analysing the attitudes of university professors (n = 294) in Lebanon towards three a priori e-learning dimensions. Favourable attitudes towards e-learning attested to faculty members' interest to get engaged in a fully-fledged e-learning programme in a country where the primary delivery educational model is essentially traditional. Discusses these attitudes in the light of the social, political and economic hindrances that impede the implementation of e-learning in the Arab region. A series of K-independent Kruskal-Wallis tests yielded significant attitudinal variations between males and females as well as between computer daily users and occasional users. Furthermore, daily computer users documented more favourable attitudes towards e-learning than their occasional user counterparts. Offers recommendations for the implementation of e-learning in “traditionally” demarcated educational systems in countries where the deployment of information and communications technologies is not widespread. (Contains 5 tables.)

Citation

Abouchedid, K. & Eid, G.M. (2004). E-Learning Challenges in the Arab World: Revelations from a Case Study Profile. Quality Assurance in Education, 12(1), 15-27. Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

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