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Online Collaboration: Supporting Novice Teachers as Researchers
Article

, , Southwest Texas State University, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 10, Number 1, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This article presents a descriptive study that examined the influence of using electronic mail (e-mail) to support novice teachers as they attempted to sustain action research projects in their classrooms. The participants included nine graduates of the Southwest Texas State University (SWT) Teacher Fellows Program and an assistant professor in the program. As part of the Teacher Fellows (a graduate-level mentoring/induction program), first-year teachers conduct action research in their respective classrooms. This study sought to determine how an online collaboration by way of e-mail could help these novice teachers continue their research efforts in the second and third years of teaching. Data was collected from e-mail messages, postsurveys, and follow-up interviews. An analysis of the data suggests that electronic collaborations are an effective method of supporting novice teachers in their research efforts. Findings include the benefits and challenges of collaborating online.

Citation

Davis, B.H. & Resta, V.K. (2002). Online Collaboration: Supporting Novice Teachers as Researchers. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 10(1), 101-117. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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