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Web-Based Notes is an Inadequate Learning Resource
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, , University of Natal, South Africa

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Norfolk, VA USA ISBN 978-1-880094-42-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Development of on-line courses requires the use of appropriate educational philosophies that discourage rote learning and passive transfer of information from teacher to learner. This paper reports on the development, use and evaluation of two, second year, Biology on-line software packages used by students in constructivist environments. The courses on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were developed in conjunction with subject experts but were designed from different perspectives. The carbohydrate metabolism course provided diverse views of a single knowledge domain and included the ability to find information in different ways. The lipid metabolism course was designed as a 'notes-on-the- Web' module. Evaluations were conducted via paper- and electronic-based software evaluation; student interviews; and analyses of student performance (pre- and post-testing; examination results). Results showed that students enjoyed using the software, found the constructivist learning environments challenging, valued the permanent availability of on-line information, found the user interface of the software products easy to use and navigate. Analyses of examination results showed that students performed better than in the previous year (traditional lectures). Results for the carbohydrate course were superior to those of the other course. It appears that interactive components that foster constructivist-based learning skills are more important in on-line learning environments than presentation of information.

Citation

Amory, A. & Naicker, K. (2001). Web-Based Notes is an Inadequate Learning Resource. In C. Montgomerie & J. Viteli (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2001--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 37-42). Norfolk, VA USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2019 from .

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