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Teaching Computers to Tell Learning Stories: Using Critical Narrative Theory to Frame Design and Evaluation Strategies for Online Educational Experiences
Article

, Ohio State University, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 13, Number 1, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Through a critical analysis of Classroom Connect?s Quest experiences from 1998-2002, this study provides a framework for using narrative theory to guide the design and evaluation of educational multimedia and online education. Narrative theory, derived from literary and media studies and influenced by cultural studies, offers numerous parallels to learning theories that circulate in educational technology scholarship while providing designers with sophisticated conceptual tools to create culturally relevant educational experiences. By using discourse analysis to analyze narrative structures including genre, story and plot, place and setting, time, character and characterization, point of view and focalization, complication, crisis, resolution and coda, this study meshes learning theories and systematic instructional design approaches with cultural theories of pedagogy that address the relationships between the intersections of race, class, gender, ethnicity, geography, and nation with learning.

Citation

Voithofer, R. (2004). Teaching Computers to Tell Learning Stories: Using Critical Narrative Theory to Frame Design and Evaluation Strategies for Online Educational Experiences. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 13(1), 47-72. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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