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Implications of Brain Research for e-Learning for Adult Learners
PROCEEDINGS

, International Christian University, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-76-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Over the past decade, e-learning has enjoyed rapid growth in higher and adult education. This may be deemed as only partially successful as many researchers provide strong evidence that even far-advanced technology does not, by itself, lead to successful learning and traditional models of using technology as a tool to provide instruction often don’t work. It is argued in the presentation that technology should be integrated with andragogy to create a new adult learning culture wherein technology is used to produce learning, not to provide instruction. This argument will be supported by findings in recent brain research that help us understand how adults learn. In the presentation, I will examine practices of e-learning for adult learners and explore three andragogical implications of modern brain research for changing how we teach adult learners in the context of Asia. It concludes with a set of recommendations for future e-learning for adult learners.

Citation

Jung, I. (2009). Implications of Brain Research for e-Learning for Adult Learners. In T. Bastiaens, J. Dron & C. Xin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2009--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1697-1702). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 19, 2019 from .

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