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An Investigation of Self-Efficacy using Educational Video Games Developed by the GK-12 STEAM Project
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, , , , , , Ohio University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Educational video games can be used affectingly when teaching science in the classroom. The Science and Technology Enrichment for Appalachian Middle-schoolers (STEAM) project has developed a variety of educational content using different technology platforms such as Flash and Second Life. Initial evidence suggests that students learn significantly more from games developed in 3D virtual worlds than 2D ones. One explanation of this phenomenon is that 2D games max a larger cognitive load from participants. Larger cognitive loads decrease the effectiveness of the educational content taught in games. The primary focus of this research is to investigate this phenomenon further by disseminating self-efficacy levels of participants playing the educational games developed by STEAM. This paper describes how self-efficacy and cognitive loading relates to the proposed methodology of teaching through 2D and 3D games.

Citation

Young, W., Peng, L.W., Carroll, S., Franklin, T., Liu, C. & Chelberg, D. (2009). An Investigation of Self-Efficacy using Educational Video Games Developed by the GK-12 STEAM Project. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3695-3707). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2019 from .

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