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Supporting Learner-Centered ICT Integration: The Influence of Collaborative and Needs-Based Professional Development
Article

, University of Prince Edward Island, Canada

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 17, Number 3, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

A mixed-method study was carried out to investigate how teacher attitude and professional development influence learner-centered Information Communication Technology (ICT) integration. A questionnaire, interviews and observations were used to gather data in a school district in Nova Scotia, Canada. Teacher data were categorized by grade level, discipline, and teaching experience. Findings suggest that learner-centered ICT integration is more likely to occur needs-based, collaborative professional development programs are provided. Study data suggest that membership in a community of practice may be one way to increase learner-centered ICT integration.

Citation

MacDonald, R. (2009). Supporting Learner-Centered ICT Integration: The Influence of Collaborative and Needs-Based Professional Development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 17(3), 315-348. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

Keywords

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