You are here:

On-line Students’ Skills, Attitudes and Instructional Expectations: Improving the Fit Between Students and Course Design
PROCEEDINGS

, University of New Mexico, United States ; , University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This investigation surveyed 249 geographically dispersed online students' computer skills, attitudes toward Internet-delivered instruction, course features students valued, and course features included in students' current distance education courses. Results were assessed by demographics. Results revealed higher self-reported computer skills for participants with greater computer use and exposure, however, a number of skills commonly incorporated into Internet-aided instruction were rated lower. Attitudes toward Internet-aided instruction were generally positive, with the most favorable reported by older students, graduate students and females. While findings relating to course features revealed general agreement between course features desired by students and those included in their current courses, there were mismatches. Implications for Internet-aided course design are presented.

Citation

Brinkerhoff, J. & Koroghlanian, C. (2007). On-line Students’ Skills, Attitudes and Instructional Expectations: Improving the Fit Between Students and Course Design. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 234-239). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 17, 2019 from .

Keywords