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Ubiquitous Discussion Forum: Introducing Mobile Phones and Voice Discussion Into a Web Discussion Forum
Article

, , , , National Central University, Taiwan

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 16, Number 2, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Invited as a paper from ED-MEDIA 2005. Grammatical and writing style errors in the original version have been corrected by our colleague who is a native English speaker.
Abstract: Web-based discussion forums enable users to share knowledge in straightforward and popular platforms. However, discussion forums have several problems, such as the lack of immediate delivery and response, the heavily text-based medium, inability to hear expressions of voice and the heuristically created discussion topics which can impede the educational process. The need to share knowledge is not restricted to web text-based environment, since knowledge lives in the world, and mobile applications supply students with the opportunity of ubiquitous learning. This study introduces mobile phones and voice discussion into a web discussion forum, and presents a ubiquitous ontology-based knowledge forum that allows students to extend learning experiences anytime and anywhere to facilitate the exchange of voice and text knowledge. The learning system environment and design approach to tackling adaptive text/audio display on small mobile phones is illustrated. Preliminary evaluation of the experiment indicates that around 74% of students are pleased with the system and benefit significantly from sharing voice knowledge. The proposed system can offer flexibility in discussion for a distance learning environment.

Citation

Wei, F.H., Chen, G.D., Wang, C.Y. & Li, L.Y. (2007). Ubiquitous Discussion Forum: Introducing Mobile Phones and Voice Discussion Into a Web Discussion Forum. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 16(2), 125-140. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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Cited By

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    Dana Tindall, The The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, United States; Kay Kyeong-Ju Seo, University of Cincinnati, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2013 (Oct 21, 2013) pp. 1431–1433

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