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Identifying effective online instructional practices in undergraduate and graduate level courses
PROCEEDINGS

, , UMUC, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This study explored the process of effective teaching and learning in online courses through an examination of instructional practices that are associated with faculty and student satisfaction, as well as student learning outcomes. The study also examined how faculty implemented specific teaching strategies in their online classes. Study findings show that practices which focused on: providing students with constructive feedback, fostering interaction and involvement, maintaining instructor presence and organization, and facilitating student learning, were high indicators of student and faculty satisfaction, as well as lower course withdrawal rates and higher passing rates. Explanations of the findings, as well as concrete examples of strategies to achieving best teaching practices are offered

Citation

Abdul-Hamid, H. & Lewis, C. (2005). Identifying effective online instructional practices in undergraduate and graduate level courses. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1864-1868). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

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