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Learning Through Multimedia Construction—A Complex Strategy
Article

, University of Wollongong, Australia

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 16, Number 2, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Multimedia construction is a complex and theoretically valid process for developing higher order thinking that can be implemented as a teaching activity and optionally associated with formal assessment in many ways. This paper explores the associated learning strategy – learning through multimedia construction, through research and reflective analysis of two class cases that feature learners from primary school and tertiary age ranges.

The lecturer/researcher develops awareness of the complexity of group interactions, resource implications, the critical design of meaningful activities, appropriate assessment tasks and assessment criteria, and the importance of task and product ownership.

Each case is presented in descriptive text accompanied by analysis using two recent activity/learning design models. A key aim is to inform those who wish to engage students in such activities of some of the critical factors that maximise the strengths of this strategy and inform meaningful negotiation of the potential pitfalls.

Citation

Brown, C. (2007). Learning Through Multimedia Construction—A Complex Strategy. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 16(2), 93-124. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 24, 2019 from .

Keywords

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    Roni Linser, Open University of Israel, Israel; Gila Kurtz, Holon Institute of Technology, Israel

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2018 (Jun 25, 2018) pp. 1506–1513

  2. Student-Generated Multimedia Projects as a Multidimensional Assessment Method in a Health Information Management Graduate Program

    Gwendolyn Morel, Texas State University, United States; Heather Keahey, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 1120–1125

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