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Teacher Professional Development: Integrating Geographic Information Technologies and Project-Based Science
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, , University of New Mexico, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of using a long-duration, project-based science professional development model on the acquisition of content knowledge associated with the use of geographic information technologies (GIT), teachers' self-assessed computer confidence in using GIT skills, and the implementation of GIT in participants' classrooms. Significant gains in content knowledge and computer confidence were revealed. Retention score data showed no significant loss of content knowledge or computer confidence from the end of year-one to the end of year-two of the professional development. Evidence of GIT integration into participants' curricula was noted within a six-month period following the end of the professional development. These results suggest that a long-duration, project-based science model was effective in teaching GIT content knowledge and raising teachers' computer confidence in using GIT tools.

Citation

Wilder, A. & Brinkerhoff, J. (2005). Teacher Professional Development: Integrating Geographic Information Technologies and Project-Based Science. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3781-3788). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 20, 2019 from .

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