You are here:

Educators’ Professional Uses of Pinterest
PROCEEDING

, , , Elon University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper presents emergent findings from an in-progress study on educators’ uses of Pinterest, a popular website and mobile app. The study is exploring how educators and educational organizations utilize Pinterest. Quantitative and qualitative data are being gathered and analyzed in order to describe patterns in use, and lay the groundwork for further research. In our sample, individual educators appeared to be more active Pinterest users than educational organizations during the data collection window. Some educators used Pinterest to promote educational resources they had created and offered for sale via sites such as TeachersPayTeachers.com. We discuss some of the apparent opportunities and challenges associated with educators’ professional uses of Pinterest.

Citation

Carpenter, J., Abrams, A. & Dunphy, M. (2016). Educators’ Professional Uses of Pinterest. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1925-1930). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 26, 2019 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Inspiration by way of Pinterest: Tracking educators’ use of social media to locate and share classroom resources

    Leanna Archambault & Annie Hale, Arizona State University, United States; Catharyn Shelton, California State University, Stanislaus, United States; Susie Puga, Arizona State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2019 (Mar 18, 2019) pp. 990–994

  2. Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam: Methodological Considerations and Challenges for Studying Educators’ Twitter Use

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Matthew Koehler & K. Bret Staudt Willet, Michigan State University, United States; Spencer P. Greenhalgh, University of Kentucky, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2019 (Mar 18, 2019) pp. 2702–2711

  3. Twitter + Voxer: Educators’ Complementary Uses of Multiple Social Media

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Tim Green, California State University Fullerton, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2236–2244

  4. Exploring How and Why Educators Use Pinterest

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Amanda Cassaday & Stefania Monti, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2222–2229

  5. Expanding Professional Learning Networks through an Institutional Twitter Hashtag

    Jeffrey Carpenter & Scott Morrison, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2216–2221

  6. Advice Seeking and Giving in the Reddit r/Teachers Online Space

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Connor McDade, Alamance Burlington School System, United States; Samantha Childers, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2207–2215

  7. Professionality, Preservice Teachers, and Twitter

    Miguel Gomez, Murray State University, United States; Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 25, No. 4 (October 2017) pp. 377–412

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.