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Flipping an Introductory, Graduate-Level Instructional Design Course: A Teaching Case
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, Concordia University, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This teaching case explores the experience of using “flipped” instruction to teach an introductory graduate course on instructional design. The one term course teaches the basics of Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) process. The reworked course consists of 8 flipped sessions out of 13. Flipped instruction is used for sessions that introduce basic skillls and are tightly integrated with readings, exercises that apply the concepts, and scaffolding activities. Class sessions are used to clarify questions, verify understanding, and transfer the knowledge more broadly. Students receive materials and interact with other classmates and the instructor through Moodle. The process of flipping the course took two years. In terms of student learning, performance was the same or better, as evidenced by grades. Student satisfaction with the flipped course was higher than the classroom version of the course.

Citation

Carliner, S. (2015). Flipping an Introductory, Graduate-Level Instructional Design Course: A Teaching Case. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1142-1147). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2020 from .

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