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Situated Professional Development and Technology Integration: The Capital Area Technology and Inquiry in Education (CATIE) Mentoring Program
Article

, , , University of Albany, United States ; , The Sage Colleges, United States ; , Teachers College, United States ; , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 10, Number 2, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This article explores the theoretical basis for a mentoring model of professional development concerned with the integration of computing technologies into classroom teaching and learning. It describes seven factors that affect professional development for technology integration and tells how the Capital Area Technology and Inquiry in Education (CATIE) Program's mentoring approach can be characterized according to each of these. Grounded in situative theories of knowledge and learning, the CATIE model places educational technology experts in schools and classrooms to work directly with teachers. Together mentors and teachers create and implement technology supported lessons that meet the teachers' instructional needs. The CATIE model aims to integrate technology into classroom activities at a grass roots level and situate teacher learning about technology in authentic classroom practice.

Citation

Holmes, A., Vargas, J.D., Swan, K., Jennings, S., Meier, E. & Rubenfeld, L. (2002). Situated Professional Development and Technology Integration: The Capital Area Technology and Inquiry in Education (CATIE) Mentoring Program. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 10(2), 169-190. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

Keywords

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