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E-Learn 2003--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education

2003

Editors

Allison Rossett

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Table of Contents

8
This conference has 8 award papers. Show award papers

Number of papers: 600

  1. Accessible E-Learning - Demystifying IMS Specifications

    Laurie Harrison, Adaptive Tech. Resource Centre, University of Toronto, Canada; Jutta Treviranus, Adaptive Tech. Resource Centre, University of Toro, Canada

    The current e-learning market is buzzing with talk of standards, user preferences and dynamically generated web sites. What is behind this new direction in web-based educational content delivery... More

    pp. 2000-2003

  2. All I Really Need to Know About E-Content I Learned In Kindergarten: Share and Share Alike

    Rosina Smith, Alberta Online Consortium, Canada; Laurie Harrison, University of Toronto, ATRC, Canada

    Have you ever wanted to take your digital content and reuse it for new users or applications? Have you ever wanted to avoid costs associated with the building new e-content that already exists on ... More

    pp. 2004-2006

  3. Creating Synergistic Learning Environments for School Administrators

    Cathy Kaufman, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, United States

    This session examines e-learning as a pivotal component in redesigning preparation programs for school principals. It describes how sharing electronic documentation of meeting specific... More

    pp. 2007-2010

  4. Principles of Educational Web Design

    Aytac Simsek, IDD&E, Syracuse University, United States; Hafize Keser & Necmi Esgi, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Ankara University, Turkey

    This paper introduces principles of Web design developed by means of census of 36 experts in educational Web design in Ankara, Turkey in 2002. 56 major principles were approved form a list of 75... More

    pp. 2011-2014

  5. My boomerang won't come back: Learning objects and interoperability

    Rory McGreal, Athabasca University, Canada

    . A learning object must be reusable if it is to have any significant application in education. For this it must be retrievable. Like a boomerang, if it can't come back it is of little use. This... More

    pp. 2015-2018

  6. E-Learning Requirements:Knowledge Management, Metadata and Semantics

    Paramjeet Singh Saini, ICT Graduate School, University of Trento, Italy

    Abstract: E-Learning is expanding its horizons in the academic settings; most of the universities are moving their courses into the web. As a result there is an increasing demand for reusable,... More

    pp. 2019-2022

  7. Using Topic Maps for eLearning

    Richard Widhalm & Thomas Mueck, University of Vienna, Austria

    This paper describes how Topic Maps, as a representative standard in the field of the Semantic Web, can be used to describe eLearning related metadata. SCORM (Sharable Content Object Model) is one ... More

    pp. 2023-2030

  8. Medical E-Learning Products: Do Standards for Colour-Design Exist?

    Matthias Thielmann, University Medical School of Essen, Essen, Germany, Germany; Team medicMED, Christina Wagner, Kristina Wolff & David Aldridge, University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany, Germany

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the colour design of medical Internet sites in the "world wide web" for possible colour standards with a particular focus on the medical e-learning product ... More

    pp. 2031-2035

  9. Approaching a low-cost solution for distance university courses

    Maria Alberta Alberti, Daniele Marini, Davide Gadia & Giulio Casella, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy

    We discuss a system to broadcast the live experience of university lectures and to archive it for further asynchronous use. At the time of lecture the broadcast is bi-directional, to guarantee... More

    pp. 2036-2039

  10. Advanced Broadband Enabled Learning (ABEL)

    Janet Murphy, York University, Canada; Karen Andrews, Edmonton Public Schools, Canada

    Students grow up with technology and don't think about integrating technology into their lives. There is a disconnect between lived reality and school reality for both students and teachers. To... More

    pp. 2040-2043

  11. Learning Environments Should Follow Standards: ELSA Does

    Ana Jesus Armendariz, Javier Lopez-Cuadrado, Aitor Tapias, Mikel Villamañe, Sara Sanz-Lumbier & Silvia Sanz-Santamaria, UPV-EHU, Spain

    This paper presents ELSA, a generic web-based e-learning system that is being implemented to work over any platform and following international standards to represent the domain. The main idea is... More

    pp. 2044-2051

  12. The Walden’s Paths Quiz Engine

    Avital Arora, Emily Barker, Unmil Karadkar, Pratik Dave, Luis Francisco-Revilla, Richard Furuta, Frank Shipman, Suvendu Dash & Zubin Dalal, Texas A&M University, United States

    The Walden's Paths project is developing tools to facilitate the inclusion of Web-based materials in classroom education. It currently includes components to create, present and manage paths that... More

    pp. 2052-2059

  13. The Mobile Presenter: Education on the Move

    Robin Ashford, SILKent, United States

    Join us for a multi-disciplinary interactive session exploring various multimedia presentation tools and technology. We will cover what's out there (computers, PDAs, projectors, and accessories... More

    pp. 2060-2061

  14. Creating ePortfolios with Adobe Acrobat

    Kathleen Bacer, Azusa Pacific University, United States

    Abstract: This interactive session features the exciting potential that the software product Adobe Acrobat poses to the electronic arena as a tool for creating dynamic and interactive portfolios.... More

    pp. 2062-2064

  15. Web it easy software and consulting for e-learning, knowledge management and content management

    Gregor Barner, web it easy GbR, Germany; Ulrich Kagelmann, agiplan GmbH, Germany

    Web it easy® creates solutions for an intelligent and interactive use of the internet. Innovative technology enables even inexperienced users to operate a wide range of complex software functions... More

    pp. 2065-2066

  16. Integrating Cooperative Knowledge Spaces into Mobile Environments

    Eßmann Bernd, Heinz Nixdorf Institute, University Paderborn, Germany; Thorsten Hampel, University Paderborn, Germany

    Mobile environments constitute an important and promising direction of e-learning. Besides developing suitable network infrastructures (wireless networks, ad hoc networks, peer-to-peer technology, ... More

    pp. 2067-2074

  17. A Framework for supporting Graphical Interactive Assessment

    Klaus Boehm & Leonhard Dietze, i3mainz, university of applied sciences Mainz, Germany

    Online-Assessment is widely accepted both for self-assessment and also as the basis for examinations. However its potential has not been fully made use of in current systems. Good instruments for... More

    pp. 2075-2078

  18. Throwing an Online Party: Building Rider University’s Collaborative Web Community for Teachers of Science and Math

    Marc Boots-Ebenfield & Peter Hester, Rider University, United States; Soren Kaplan, iCohere, United States

    Through the metaphor of "throwing a party", we will provide a framework for understanding the building of an online community (Kaplan, 2002), provide models and tools for community-building, and... More

    pp. 2079-2081

  19. The eZ! Way to Create Your Online Class: A Video Demonstration

    Henry Borysewicz, John D. Odegard School for Aerospace Sciences, United States

    eZ! is a user friendly Course Management System, with features and functionality created in direct response to faculty wishes and needs. It enables instructors to quickly and easily create and... More

    p. 2082

  20. The Ambulant Annotator: Medical Multimedia Annotations on Tablet PCs

    Dick Bulterman, CWI, Netherlands

    A new generation of tablet computers has stimulated end-user interest on annotating documents by making pen-based commentary and spoken audio labels to otherwise static documents. The typical... More

    pp. 2083-2086