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ED-MEDIA 2003--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications

2003

Editors

David Lassner; Carmel McNaught

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Table of Contents

13
This conference has 13 award papers. Show award papers

Number of papers: 803

  1. A Flexible Approach to English for Academic Purposes: Web-enabled Constructivism

    Miriam Schcolnik & Sara Kol, Tel Aviv University, Israel

    In this paper we describe how the web allows for the implementation of a constructivist approach in EAP (English for Academic Purposes) courses, which deal with specialized academic texts as well... More

    pp. 1471-1474

  2. Technology-Enhanced Learning in Science Teacher Education: Addressing the Goals of Modelling Learning

    Rosa Maria Sperandeo-Mineo, Giovanni Tarantino & Claudio Fazio, University of Palermo, Italy

    New pedagogical practices emerging in classrooms using ICT involve changes in the roles of teachers and students, the goals of the curriculum, and/or the educational materials or infrastructure.... More

    pp. 1475-1479

  3. Leadership Development in Computer-Mediated Distance Education

    Justin Ahn, Fairfield University, United States

    There has been increasing number of research studies that were conducted to find the effectiveness of the Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) as a tool for many distance education courses. The... More

    pp. 1480-1483

  4. Peer Evaluation Using the Web and @Comparison of Meta-cognition between Experts and Novices

    Kanji Akahori, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan; See Min Kim, Korea Baptist Theological University

    This paper describes the peer evaluation of a university course that was developed to learn problem solving skills through group work and discussion. At the end of the course, peer evaluation by... More

    pp. 1484-1487

  5. Media Frameworks for On-line Learning

    James Arbeiter & Dean Harris, LegatoVideo LLC, United States

    Educational on-line technologies continue to evolve for distance learning, interactive tutoring, vocational training, and virtual field trips. Although computers have penetrated more classrooms and... More

    pp. 1488-1489

  6. Online Collaborative Projects and ESL Learning in the Arab World

    pp. 1490-1493

  7. Designing For Online Learning Communities

    Chris Brook & Ron Oliver, Edith Cowan University, Australia

    This paper investigates the development of sense of community among learners engaging in online learning where the principles of collaborative learning are considered key instructional strategies. ... More

    pp. 1494-1500

  8. Cross-Campus Collaboration : Beyond Discussion Boards and Text-Based Learning

    Nina Buchanan, University of Hawaii at Hilo, United States; Rebecca Akporiaye, Department of Education, Arizona State University West, United States; Bill Chen & Robert Chi, OTDL, University of Hawaii at Hilo, United States

    Adult learners who are working full time and in need of professional development are faced with a dilemma of identifying a program or degree that best meets their interest and needs or making do... More

    pp. 1501-1504

  9. Cross-Campus Collaboration: Beyond Discussion Boards and Text-Based Learning

    Nina Buchanan, University of Hawaii at Hilo, United States; Rebecca Akporiaye, Arizona State University West, United States; Bill Chen & Robert Chi, OTDL, University of Hawaii at Hilo, United States

    Adult learners who are working full time and in need of professional development are faced with a dilemma of identifying a program or degree that best meets their interest and needs or making do... More

    pp. 1505-1508

  10. The Effect of On-line, Asynchronous Interaction On Student Conceptual Understanding of Light and Color

    Kevin Carr & Brent Wilson, George Fox University, United States

    This study investigates the effect of asynchronous, on-line interaction on student conceptual understanding of light and color. Two versions (N and Y) of an on-line independent-study module on... More

    pp. 1509-1510

  11. Validity and Reliability of Peer Assessments with a Missing Data Estimation Technique

    Kwangsu Cho & Christian Schunn, University of Pittsburgh, United States

    The validity and reliability of peer assessment are under debate because previous research did not consider both of the critical indices. Therefore, this paper examines the validity and reliability... More

    pp. 1511-1514

  12. collaborative learning in the high school: a project of educational robotics brazil

    renato laurato & Nielce costa, colégio dante alighieri, Brazil

    In this paper we are reporting our experiment of a Robotics Project that was performed at Colégio Dante Alighieri a private high school in São Paulo, Brazil from August through November, 2002.... More

    pp. 1515-1518

  13. The virtual Halloween: Cyber conflict in a virtual learning community

    Johannes Cronje, University of Pretoria, South Africa

    This paper tells the story of a conflict that arose in a virtual community after a member who was offended by a Halloween site built by the community, hacked and destroyed it. The paper considers... More

    pp. 1519-1526

  14. SEE (Shrine Educational Experience): an Online Cooperative 3D Environment Supporting Innovative Educational Activities

    Nicoletta Di Blas, Paolo Paolini & Caterina Poggi, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

    What do new technologies have to offer to education? And in particular, can online collaborative 3D environments fulfill high educational goals, combined with the playful and social aspects that... More

    pp. 1527-1534

  15. Using Corporate Consultants to Connect Online Students with the Real World

    Sharon Guan, DePaul University, United States; Peter Mikolaj, Indiana State University, United States

    One of the goals of education is to prepare student to succeed in their careers. To achieve such a goal entails efforts in at least three areas: 1) defining what competencies (knowledge, skills,... More

    pp. 1535-1538

  16. Explore the Basic Emotion Set for Online Collaborative Learning: Some Implications for the Instructional Design

    Yungwei Hao, University of Texas at Austin, United States

    Numerous research studies support the claim that emotion plays an important role in decision-making and performance as it influences cognitive processes (Kort, & Reilly, 2002). While most studies... More

    pp. 1539-1541

  17. A learning Object Framework for Agent Supported Personalized Learning Services

    Igor Hawryszkiewycz, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

    Learning objects are seen here a providing a dual framework. One is the flexibility needed to reuse learning material in different environments. The other is a framework for reusable software... More

    pp. 1542-1545

  18. An Online Mentoring Practicum in Physical and Health Education teacher preparation: Preliminary findings and future directions

    Doug Hearne, Lori Lockyer, Gregg Rowland & John Patterson, University of Wollongong, Australia

    An important aspect of any professional education is the opportunity for students to engage in meaningful practical experiences. In pre-service teacher education, this vital practicum component... More

    pp. 1546-1553

  19. Collaborative Teams Solve Wicked Problems: Theory into Practice

    Rachelle Heller, The George Washington University, United States; Joel Foreman, George Mason University, United States; Stephanie Cupp & Sonja Gievska-Krliu, The George Washington University, United States

    This paper introduces a prototype of a distributed learning environment designed to enable virtual teams to collaborate to solve wicked problems. The prototype features a problem solving rubric, a ... More

    pp. 1554-1557

  20. Examining the Impact of Motivation on Learning Communities

    David Holder & Leslie Moller, University of North Texas, United States

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to 1) determine if learning communities have an inherent motivational effect upon learners and 2) if so, does that higher motivation impact attitudinal... More

    pp. 1558-1561